‘Rebels’ No More


A mural of the Ghost crew. Image courtesy of io9.

I’ve spent a lot of time lately thinking about who Star Wars Rebels is for. It’s ostensibly an animated kids show on a Disney network but new episodes air at 9 in the evening, a time block fitting for a cable drama series. Think about it like this: you have to stay up later to catch Rebels than to see a new episode of Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead. That’s kind of ridiculous.

My own nitpicks aside, Rebels’ three part finale was an excellent closing that answered most of our questions and gave us some new ones to ponder in a satisfying, anticipatory manner. Ezra’s journey has been delightfully weird and unpredictable, and since there was no way in hell Disney was going to kill off a 15-year-old, having him ride off to God-knows-where with some flying whales (I like to think that whoever created the Purrgil is a Gojira fan) dragging Thrawn along seems like a satisfying answer to “Where do these characters go once the OT kicks in?”

Personally, I feel like the galaxy’s most evil art critic/ultimate cultural appropriator should of just been killed off, like his lackey Governor Pryce. This isn’t because I dislike Thrawn; on the contrary, I find him to be a terrific antagonist, which is why I thought his annihilation would give Rebels the most triumphant possible conclusion. But I get it; fans love him and creators are going to want to use him for future stories. And just like everyone else, I desperately want to know how his unwilling voyage with Ezra and the Purrgil will effect him.

The last minutes of “Family Reunion – and – Farewell” jumps forward to post-Return of the Jedi to give us a peak at the remaining Ghost crew members. It took me a few seconds to wrap my head around the implications of Jacen Syndulla‘s existence and so, uh…yeah, that happened (Kanera shippers all of over the world let out an audible sigh of relief). It’s easy to say in hindsight, but of all the good guy characters on Rebels, Kanan always had the highest chance of dying. And while we all miss him dearly, at least he and Hera’s “will-they-won’t-they” business has some degree of resolution.

Speaking of shipping, Zeb and Kallus had a nice little moment together in which Zeb brought the Imperial agent – turned – Rebel to Lira San to show him that the Lasat had survived the Empire’s extermination. There’s quite a few people in Rebels‘ fandom that are pulling for these two to get together in the romantic sense. I’m not against that per se, but I always thought that the whole “Kallus tried to wipe out Zeb’s people” thing would just be too much for love to overcome, even though the genocide didn’t succeed. I’m not in any way an expert on LGBTQ issues, so what I have to say here carries little weight. For what it’s worth, Dave Filoni is down with your Zeb/Kallus ship.

“Family Reunion – and – Farewell” saves the best and most intriguing for last. Sabine has settled on Lothal (per my headcanon, she totally runs a DIY punk venue in Lothal City) and right before the episode cuts to credits, she meets up with Ahsoka – cosplaying as Gandalf the White, it would seem – to go search for Erza, who is still absent.

Rebels has been through a pretty astonishing amount of change in its four season. It’s crazy to think that it started out as this relatively low-key story about a localized piece of the Galactic Civil War and now it’s giving us space whales and time travel and shit. Even more so than the new movies (which I like), Rebels has really been expanding what we thought was possible in the Star Wars galaxy. Speculation is already rampant on what the next journey of these characters will be and what form it would take. As much I hate to dash people’s hopes and dreams, I don’t think the Rebels crew will make the jump to live action any time soon. No one has ever come out and officially said it, but I strongly suspect Rebels has the same relationship to the Star Wars films that Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. has with the wider MCU; the TV shows can pull stuff from the movies to work with, but not vice versa. Our burning questions about Ezra, Sabine and Ahsoka will likely come in the form of comics or another animated series.

Then again, Saw Gerrera showed up in Rogue One, so you never know.

Watching Star Wars Rebels has been a pleasure over these last four years. If you are one of those Star Wars fans who hasn’t been feeling Episodes VII or VIII, maybe give this show a shot? It couldn’t hurt.

Here’s Our First Look at “The Incredibles 2”

Jesus Christ, this has been a long wait. Up until it was announced two years ago, I was convinced I wouldn’t ever get a sequel to my all-time favorite Pixar flick. Thanks largely to the efforts of the Disney-owned Marvel Cinematic Universe, superhero movies have only been the most popular thing on the planet for at least five years now. They would be mad not to give us another adventure with the Parr family. Just to give you an idea of how long ago The Incredibles was, consider this brief list of things that had happened (or not yet happened) as of its release date of Nov. 5, 2004:

George W. Bush was on the cusp of re-election.

The Boston Red Sox had just broken their curse.

The Star Wars prequel trilogy hadn’t been completed yet.

Peyton Manning hadn’t yet reached a Super Bowl.

The Venture Bros. had wrapped up its first (First!) season.

We foolishly believed that Alien vs. Predator would be the worst thing to happen to the Alien franchise.

Hell, Disney didn’t even own Pixar yet.

We didn’t even consider the possibility of  waiting 14 years for Incredibles 2.

Wow, that is some shit isn’t it? I still haven’t even entertained the notion of forgiving Disney for giving us a goddamned Cars trilogy before Incredibles 2. Pixar as a brand isn’t quite as bulletproof as it once was (from a critical standpoint) and while they’ve still made some good and sometimes even great movies since 2004, none of them has resonated with me as much as The Incredibles has. I was 15 years-old and a freshman in high school then and I saw it in theaters three times. Curiously, this was around the age I started getting into South Park, King of the Hill and Family Guy (for instance, I had stopped watching Nickelodeon that year, which is how I missed out on Avatar: The Last Airbender while it was actually on the air). Clearly, the Disney shit wasn’t done with me. I’m pretty sure The Incredibles taught me that it was okay to still watch and enjoy stuff aimed at kids, even into adolescence and adulthood.

If the barely-a-trailer above is anything to go off, youngest member Jack-Jack will have a substantially larger role. If you have never seen the Jack-Jack Attack short film, I strongly recommend it. In addition to being funny and cute, it shows what happens with Jack-Jack and babysitter Kari while the rest of the Parrs were on Nomanisan Island and also shows off more of Jack-Jack’s powers, which is apparently everything. I’m thinking Incredibles 2 will be centered on the youngest Parr; the tyke is pretty powerful and there’s bound to be nefarious people or groups out there who’ll be interested in him. But that’s just speculation.

The Incredibles 2 comes out on June 15, 2018. My expectations are Jupiter-sized.



All Hail the Millennial Nostalgia Industrial Complex

The Millennial Nostalgia Industrial Complex is real.

It reared its head over the holiday weekend in the form of not one, but two marathons. The Harry Potter marathon on the channel formerly known as ABC Family wasn’t anything out of the ordinary, but coupled with the Disney channel airing every single one of their original movies, it created a force of devastating nostalgia overload.

Millennials on the older end of that generational spectrum are no doubt already aware of this, but if you’re in that sweet spot between late ’80s and early ’90s? This might be news to you; you are now just old enough to notice that the “Hey, remember how awesome this old shit you loved as a kid is/was?” marketing apparatus is now being pointed directly at you. We saw the beginning of this with the launch of Pokémon GO, and there is only going to be more of it as we get older.

This doesn’t necessarily have to be a bad thing, but seeing as Generation X has had to deal with a deluge of hot donkey shit made from adaptations of stuff they loved, we should absolutely be prepared to deal with it. The new Power Rangers movie could very well be awful enough to generate multiple existential crises. Accepting that possibility now will make coping with it later much easier. In the first grade, I used to sprint home from school (we lived in walking distance) to catch episodes of Power Rangers and sometimes I would practice their fighting moves while I watched. Nothing will take those memories away from me; not even a shitty Power Rangers movie.

I hope everyone had a lovely weekend, regardless of what you were doing. If anything, we should feel lucky Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon didn’t decide to jump on the nostalgia bandwagon. That would have been a bloodbath.